Sage: The healer, wisdom keeper and spirit releaser...

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This is a garden essential for me.  Sage is a timeless aromatic grows in one of my sacred garden spots. It's filled with volatile oils, making extremely medicinal in addition to its culinary value. It’s a gorgeous hedge looking herb in the summer and just rubbing the leaves through my hands calms me.  Sage is a plant that is wise and powerful.  I use it during the fall winter for sore throats as a gargle, spray or tea, for excess sweating including menopause, oral health as a tooth powder and for digestion as a tea.  

Also I love using garden sage for smudging.  Although I do use white sage and sell it at the shop, I make smudge bundles with my garden sage. It does have a similar aroma and when your smudging, it is the intention that counts.  I   I know this is woo-woo but ask your plant if it would like to help you clear energies or space and then listen.  I also use yarrow, eastern cedar, lavender, mullein and seasonal flowers to create smudging sticks.  

Culinary Uses: 

Make the fresh or dried herb as a tea with a little fresh lemon juice and honey after dinner to help with digestion.  Also if your growing sage, add sprigs of it to your roast veggies and meats.  It's really strong so a little bit will do you. 


Traditional Medicinal Uses: So many to list (honestly it goes on and on) but main uses include fungal treatments (see recipe below for a powerful foot bath),digestion excessive sweating, sore throats, colds and flu, oral care, hot flashes, boost brain function, lowering cholesterol and to support type 2 Diabetes. See below for herbal nerd alert. 

Energy and Manifesting: Smudging is an ancient practice that I love.  I often refer to the plants as our grandmothers and grandfathers of spirit, they know what we need and I cleanse my space almost every day to make sure that or any negativity.  Sage in particular, I burn when I need to rid the body and fields of conflict, anger, illness or evil.  It also is used for purification of space and use when to shift directions or after directions shift for you (illness, death, moving, negative person or thing). 


Medicinal Recipe

Sage Foot Soak to help with athlete’s foot, tired feet, sore or swollen feet, smelly feet, diabetic foot sores and more.


Add 1 cup of fresh or dried sage and a ½ cup fresh or dried sage to a container that can hold your feet. Add enough boiling water to cover your feet and let the herbs steep in the water until the temperature is cool enough to safely soak your feet. Soak your feet in the herbal water for 15-30 minutes. 

Materia Medica 

Family: Lamiaceae

Parts used: traditionally aerial portions

Energetics: warming, drying

Plant properties: aromatic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, antiseptic, alterative or blood mover

How to use: tea, tincture, tooth powder, foot bath, steam and culinary

Notes on usage: When NOT to use sage medicinally: during any part of pregnancy and breastfeeding. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER

Colleen O’Bryant (Provider) is a trained herbalist and not a licensed doctor or registered healthcare practitioner. She cannot and does not claim to diagnose health conditions, nor prescribe medicines. Colleen O’Bryant does not claim that the information and products she provides to Client will prevent, alleviate, or cure any diseases or medical conditions. The information and products Colleen and Wild Roots Apothecary provides is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment. Please consult your medical care provider before using herbal products, particularly if you have a known medical condition, allergy or if you are pregnant or nursing. Always consult a medical doctor before modifying your diet, using any new product, drug, supplement, or doing any new exercises. Wild Roots Apothecary statements and products have not been evaluated by the FDA and they are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or condition. Client understands that Colleen is not yet certified by the American Herbalists Guild, but by working with clients such as yourself she is gaining the required hours of practice to apply towards her certification.

 

Wild Roots Apothecary does not claim to be a pharmacy or prescribe medicines. Additionally, Wild Roots does not claim to be able to cure or relieve the client's specific condition or illness with the herbal formulations or recommendations provided.

 

 



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